Overlooked

 

Overlooked

How immemorable, he thinks,
drilling into the wall.
Another hole, another day.
Fill them, and still others
beg creation.

Say mouth. Say void,
followed by tongue and burden,
by orifice and bland. Say
invisible. Empty. Say forget.

That we plan is given.
But who writes the manual
to our lives? The hammer

does not shiver at the thought
of itself. Take this board
and remove only that portion
the screw will occupy.

Level the hook. Admire
the work. Adjust.
Do this twice.

“Overlooked” was published in Mantle in August 2017.

22 thoughts on “Overlooked

  1. This poem invites one to look at oneself in a different light, especially these lines:

    “That we plan is given.
    But who writes the manual
    to our lives? The hammer

    does not shiver at the thought
    of itself. Take this board
    and remove only that portion
    the screw will occupy.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s interesting to consider that there must be something that drives the making and/or being of *void*. Is this *something* the thing that makes it all seem to have a purpose? And does it matter whether or not we can differentiate between this seeming and actual purpose? If memory serves, I believe Heidegger tried to assign a degree of mattering to the ontology of “being” as relates to human existence, by equating our “Dasein” (literally, our being there, present) with the concept of Care, which is how I read your last lines: “Admire / the work. Adjust. / Do this twice.” What is at stake is that you, Poet, cannot simply “overlook” the tenuousness of being in the face of nothing. One must, indeed, *care* an awful lot to bore one’s way again and again into the nothing in effort to have something to show for it. The beautiful and vital somethings you make, make us feel like we matter. It is a seeming that’s synonymous with purpose, and one for which I’m grateful, at that.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Overlooked — O at the Edges – jetsetterweb

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.