As Breath Defines Constriction

corona

 

As Breath Defines Constriction (Solar Wind)

The snake swallows itself, integrating the opposite. Or, illustrating the
nature of earthquakes, encourages conjecture.

Wind meditation. The practice of circling mountains, of emptying oneself.

Matter accelerating away from the sun. The prickly pear on the roof.

The Tendai monks of Hiei run 40 kilometers each day for 100 consecutive days.
Only then may they petition to complete the thousand-day trial.

Coronal mass ejections temporarily deform the Earth’s magnetic field.

I sweat while driving to the store for cold beer.

The heliopause is the point at which the solar wind’s strength is no longer
sufficient to push back the interstellar medium.

No matter its destination, a comet’s tail always points away from the sun.

At which point does one hear the sound of sunlight entering stone?

They must complete the thousand-day challenge or die. To this end,
each monk carries a knife and length of rope on his journey.

A map is simply paper. Solar wind, cord of death.

Stones in the path, quivering earth. Eyes focused ahead.

 

***

 

“As Breath Defines Constriction” is included in The Circumference of Other, my offering in the Silver Birch Press publication, IDES: A Collection of Poetry Chapbooks, available on Amazon.

 

stones

 

8 thoughts on “As Breath Defines Constriction

  1. That was so interesting, Bob! I found myself googling the Tendai monks. You’ve given the reader a lot to think about – his/her destination: “eyes focused ahead”. Wonderful poem!

    Liked by 1 person

      • Yes – it’s humbling to think of this do it or die approach to spiritual excellence, I’m good at cutting myself and others a lot of slack. Plus I like the social aspect of being human. You’re brilliant at merging science/factual info with a personal take – the poem that results lingers.

        Like

  2. Such a collection of wonders is what keeps me going. I love the question about the sound of sunlight hitting stone; sadly my tinnitus will probably keep me from ever answering it, but I will still enjoy the process of observation.

    Liked by 1 person

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